Book ¼ witzend Author Wallace Wood 656 pages ✓ Hannahredhead


Mobi witzend Author Wallace Wood

Book ¼ witzend Author Wallace Wood 656 pages ✓ Hannahredhead ☆ When the formulaic constraints censorious nature and onerous lack of creator s rights in mainstream comics got to be too much for the brilliant cartoonist Wallace Wood he struck out on his own with the self published witzend It became a havenWhen the formulaic constraints censorious nature and onerous lack of creator s rights in mainstream comics got to be too much for the brilliant cartoonist Wallace Wood he struck out on his own with the self published witzend It became a haven for Wood and his fellow professional cartoonist friend Given the talent involved a plethora of brilliant cartoonists from both the mainstream and the underground contributed work to this ground breaking zine the result is something of a disappointment The whole is less than the sum of its parts Witzend emerged fairly early in what was to become the underground explosion coming after the earliest such work but preceding the seminal Zap and representing an early attempt to provide a venue for creator owned comics work The zine's primary claim to fame on this front is probably its catholic agenda it trumpets a policy of no policy from the beginning so it gives us cartoonists who were already legends Wood Kurtzman Frazetta Williamson etc beside up and comers Wrightson Jeffrey Jones etc cartoonists rooted in the mainstream notably Ditko but others including even the King himself Jack Kirby and cartoonists beginning to define the underground sensibility eg Spiegelman Bodé Seeing figures such as Ditko and Spiegelman rubbing shoulders is fascinating The content is also eclectic Most is comics of course but there are single images portfolios including the final good girls issue featuring nothing but a diverse array of images of women most of which conform to the good girl ie hot aesthetic but many that don't illustrated poems and fiction even a special issue devoted to the films of W C Fields admittedly a bit of an outlier even in this context And it is a treasure trove There are lots of great things here Whatever one thinks of Ditko's politics for instance it's hard not to credit the first two Mister A stories and the two Avenging World stories that appear here as technically masterful and as works that pushed against the boundaries of what comics couldshould do in ways very different from what the underground and subseuent alternative cartoonists did the Avenging World stuff especially which shows an amazing grasp of comics design and iconography regardless of one's opinions of Ditko's politics Aside the only issue to run a letter column includes a letter specifically critical of Ditko and another early issue includes a rather unkind parody of Mister A; so despite the policy of no policy and of freedom of artistic expression even the magazine itself seems to have been ambivalent about Ditko's workNevertheless the policy of no policy and probably the fact that Witzend didn't pay its contributors giving them only the copyright in their own work but no compensation means that the whole thing is very scattershot very hit and miss The idea of a no holds barred editorial ethos has its appeal but the magazine does not capitalize on the possibilities For one thing too much of the work really doesn't take advantage of the possibilities of no editorial interference; many a story here differs only superficially from what would have been permissible at Warren for instance or even at Marvel or DC; clichéd sword and sorcery fantasy or SF does not transcend its limitations by throwing in a few tits For another there is also something to be said for a sense of mission and of editorial planning Many a promising start peters out many an odd by way gets pursued the Fields issue being merely the most extensive and overt instance many a work or artist promised in the next or a subseuent issue never materializes And after the first few issues which came out on a fairly regular schedule the uality declines considerably as apparently fewer of the great cartoonists found a venue that offered only ownership but no money a viable outlet for their work There is still the occasional gem almost up to the end but later issues look even cobbled together than the earlier ones Witzend was a noble and idealistic experiment and this collection offers an excellent document of the magazine including illuminating essays and reminiscences However as with many another noble and idealistic and innovative experiment the result is often than not of historical than aesthetic interest Fansscholars of comics especially of work going against the grain of the mainstream will find a lot to interest them here but I suspect readers just looking for good comics will find it uneven at best

witzend Author Wallace WoWhen the formulaic constraints censorious nature and onerous lack of creator s rights in mainstream comics got to be too much for the brilliant cartoonist Wallace Wood he struck out on his own with the self published witzend It became a haven for Wood and his fellow professional cartoonist friend Given the talent involved a plethora of brilliant cartoonists from both the mainstream and the underground contributed work to this ground breaking zine the result is something of a disappointment The whole is less than the sum of its parts Witzend emerged fairly early in what was to become the underground explosion coming after the earliest such work but preceding the seminal Zap and representing an early attempt to provide a venue for creator owned comics work The zine's primary claim to fame on this front is probably its catholic agenda it trumpets a policy of no policy from the beginning so it gives us cartoonists who were already legends Wood Kurtzman Frazetta Williamson etc beside up and comers Wrightson Jeffrey Jones etc cartoonists rooted in the mainstream notably Ditko but others including even the King himself Jack Kirby and cartoonists beginning to define the underground sensibility eg Spiegelman Bodé Seeing figures such as Ditko and Spiegelman rubbing shoulders is fascinating The content is also eclectic Most is comics of course but there are single images portfolios including the final good girls issue featuring nothing but a diverse array of images of women most of which conform to the good girl ie hot aesthetic but many that don't illustrated poems and fiction even a special issue devoted to the films of W C Fields admittedly a bit of an outlier even in this context And it is a treasure trove There are lots of great things here Whatever one thinks of Ditko's politics for instance it's hard not to credit the first two Mister A stories and the two Avenging World stories that appear here as technically masterful and as works that pushed against the boundaries of what comics couldshould do in ways very different from what the underground and subseuent alternative cartoonists did the Avenging World stuff especially which shows an amazing grasp of comics design and iconography regardless of one's opinions of Ditko's politics Aside the only issue to run a letter column includes a letter specifically critical of Ditko and another early issue includes a rather unkind parody of Mister A; so despite the policy of no policy and of freedom of artistic expression even the magazine itself seems to have been ambivalent about Ditko's workNevertheless the policy of no policy and probably the fact that Witzend didn't pay its contributors giving them only the copyright in their own work but no compensation means that the whole thing is very scattershot very hit and miss The idea of a no holds barred editorial ethos has its appeal but the magazine does not capitalize on the possibilities For one thing too much of the work really doesn't take advantage of the possibilities of no editorial interference; many a story here differs only superficially from what would have been permissible at Warren for instance or even at Marvel or DC; clichéd sword and sorcery fantasy or SF does not transcend its limitations by throwing in a few tits For another there is also something to be said for a sense of mission and of editorial planning Many a promising start peters out many an odd by way gets pursued the Fields issue being merely the most extensive and overt instance many a work or artist promised in the next or a subseuent issue never materializes And after the first few issues which came out on a fairly regular schedule the uality declines considerably as apparently fewer of the great cartoonists found a venue that offered only ownership but no money a viable outlet for their work There is still the occasional gem almost up to the end but later issues look even cobbled together than the earlier ones Witzend was a noble and idealistic experiment and this collection offers an excellent document of the magazine including illuminating essays and reminiscences However as with many another noble and idealistic and innovative experiment the result is often than not of historical than aesthetic interest Fansscholars of comics especially of work going against the grain of the mainstream will find a lot to interest them here but I suspect readers just looking for good comics will find it uneven at best

Mobi ¸ witzend Author Wallace Wood ☆ Wallace Wood

witzend Author Wallace Wood Õ Im Steranko Jeff Jones Howard Chaykin Trina Robbins Bernie Wrightson and literally dozens it was bound to be a great ride Now Fantagraphics presents the complete run of witzend in this beautiful slipcased 2 volume set with a special introduction by Bill Pearson and a history by Patrick Rosenkrant Like HUMBUG and TRUMP not the legendary magazine Witzend is collected and it's a bit of a miss The early Wood edited issues are pretty great but once he takes a backseat it becomes a real mixed bag until you get an issue devoted to WC Fields which I can't imagine anyone outside of Fields collectors enjoying Mobi ¸ witzend Author Wallace Wood ☆ Wallace Wood

Wallace Wood ☆ witzend Author Wallace Wood Mobi

Wallace Wood ☆ witzend Author Wallace Wood Mobi S where they could produce the kind of personal work that they wanted to do without regard to commercial demands and with friends like Frank Frazetta Al Williamson Reed Crandall Ralph Reese Archie Goodwin Angelo Torres Steve Ditko Harvey Kurtzman Bill Elder Art Spiegelman Don Martin Vaughn Bode J On some level you have to consider witzend both a success and failure It never created the opportunities for its creators or cartoonists in general that it was intended to author The comics themselves are freuently enjoyable and freuently gorgeous as the artists could draw a lot better than they wrote but rarely exceptional and often below the standard of professional published work Yet witzend is still an obvious early step in the direction of creators controlling and owning their own work and it provided inspiration however indirect for much of Image Comics and other creator owned comics of today There's much to applaud in witzend even if it never came close to achieving what it might have accomplished in another era Fantagraphics did their usually outstanding job on this slipcase edition