review Les larmes d'Éros 103

characters Les larmes d'Éros

review Les larmes d'Éros 103 á Tears of Eros is the culmination of Georges Bataille's inuiries into the relationship between violence and the sacred Taking up such figures as Giles de Rais Erzebet Bathory the Maruis de Sade El Greco Gustave Moreau Andre Breton Voodoo practitioners and Chinese torture victims Bataille reveals their common obsession deathThis esEvery era was developed out of ideas explored in Erotism Death and Sexuality and Prehistoric Painting Lascaux or the Birth of Art In it Bataille examines death the little death that follows sexual climax the proximate death in sadomasochistic practices and death as part of religious ritual and sacrificeBataille is one of the most important writers of the century. Philosophers don't get to write about history any because they don't write anything that makes sense It's the new law established by me My problems with this book are many First is that it is way too vague and homogenizing The book covers the entire history of civilization mostly Western except when he takes Chinese torture victims and Voodoo practitioners out of context for no reason in 200ish pages the majority of which are taken up with illustrations So of course he can't actually say anything he can only scrape up some vague examples of situations which were both erotic and violent He entirely eschews any context for why a civilization would mingle ideas of sex and violence or what the long term implications are of that phenomenon Does it perpetuate violence Does it normalize sex Who knows certainly not BatailleObviously I'm a scholar of the twenty first century but I really felt like something was left to be desired from his interpretation I wanted to hear about gendered dimensions of violence I wanted to hear about drugs and alcohol I wanted to hear about class differences I wanted to hear about race and culture I wanted ANYTHING that was an actual dimension of this phenomenon If this were a freshman philosophy paper I'd fail itHe also does this irritating thing of saying that something is erotic and horrifying but doesn't explain why it is erotic At the end he has g r a p h i c images of a Chinese man having his flesh hacked off while he is still alive In this picture the man's ribs can be seen but he is wearing a kind of glassy eyed expression presumably caused by the opium which was given to these victims so that they did not pass out from the pain I clearly understand the tragic part of this example HOWEVER he does not explain what is supposed to be erotic about this He hints that the smile is indicative of a kind of ecstasy on the behalf of the tortured man YikesIf he just wanted to write about his gore related sexual fetishes he could have kept those to himself

review ☆ eBook or Kindle ePUB Ï Georges Bataille

Tears of Eros is the culmination of Georges Bataille's inuiries into the relationship between violence and the sacred Taking up such figures as Giles de Rais Erzebet Bathory the Maruis de Sade El Greco Gustave Moreau Andre Breton Voodoo practitioners and Chinese torture victims Bataille reveals their common obsession deathThis essay illustrated with artwork from. Originally given three stars back in '08 read in September of 2007 but after a second reading I've decided to add an additional half star rounding up to four Bataille's a strange cat Despite some fascinating information here eg the paintings in the Lascaux pit the lack of substance behind Bataille's theoriesassertions often reduces the text to a series of disjointed declarations

Georges Bataille Ï 3 free download

Les larmes d'ÉrosMichel FoucaultGeorges Bataille was born in Billom France in 1897 He was a librarian by profession Also a philosopher novelist and critic he was founder of the College of Sociology In 1959 Bataille began Tears of Eros and it was completed in 1961 his final work City Lights published two of his other works Story of the Eye and The Impossible Bataille died in 1962. A collection of dirty and violent pictures that touches on eroticism and death I read it and laugh Only in the face of horror does the fragmentary totality of being become uncovered